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Death of the Picture Book Works Cited

Barnes, Brooks. “Lab Watches Web Surfers to See Which Ads Work.” The New York Times – Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. 26 July 2009. Web. 7 Oct. 2010.

Itzkoff, Dave. “Nickelodeon’s Stepchild, Eager for More Love.” The New York Times – Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. 19 Nov. 2010. Web. 7 Oct. 2010.

Jensen, Elizabeth. “In a Series, Nickelodeon Will Focus on Math.” The New York Times – Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. 10 Jan. 2010. Web. 7 Oct. 2010.

Olson, Elizabeth. “‘Dora’ Special Explores Influence on Children.” The New York Times – Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. 8 Aug. 2010. Web. 7 Oct. 2010.

Stanley, Alessandra. “A Fun-Loving Sponge Who Keeps Things Clean.” The New York Times – Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. 9 July 2009. Web. 7 Oct. 2010.

Stapinski, Helene. “Spaghetti Tacos: Silly Enough for Young Eaters.” The New York Times – Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. 5 Oct. 2010. Web. 7 Oct. 2010.

Final Draft: Death of the Picture Book

Learn to use utensils, tie your shoes, dress yourself, learn to read, use the remote. There has been a drastic change in which childhood is now being shaped. The picture book is becoming extinct and being replaced with its high tech counterpart, the TV. In the article “Leaving The Pictures Behind” the author reveals that publishers reported last week that sales are suffering and they have had to cut down on the number of new titles. Some might blame the recession, but the main reason for the decrease in children’s picture books is due to the large push toward reading chapter books. Not only has there been more pressure on higher-level reading, but print media has also become the less popular choice when it comes to influencing today’s youth. The new media affects everything: morals, values, education, what we are eating and what we are wearing. It even infects our speech. Is multimodal media becoming the new “picture book” for children?

The Walt Disney Company is studying on the type of media ads use to get consumers to buy their product. Their media of focus lies in television and internet ads. In the article “Lab Watches Web Surfers to See Which Ads Work” Barnes affirms that “There is also a focus on new forms of advertising in programming shown on actual televisions.” This proves that television is becoming the media hub because it has become increasing popular. Tracey Scheppach, video innovations director for Starcom MediaVest Group, reveals, “Everybody is trying to figure out the ad models of the future…” Her comment even shows that companies are recognizing the change in interest towards digital media.

The popular show iCarly is a great example of how the media has transitioned into the use of television. The show features Spencer, Carly’s wacky artist brother, making his famous spaghetti tacos for dinner. After seeing the odd combination on iCarly, kids are asking for spaghetti tacos for dinner too. The creator of the show, Dan Schneider admits in The New York Times article “It was just a little joke I came up with for one episode, then it turned into a running joke. And now it’s this thing people actually do.” The infiltrating of TV into our lives shows how influential television shows can be. Even the show demonstrates the evident shift in media. iCarly has her own web show that she makes with her two best friends. Her wed show has inspired toys and other merchandise as well as a real live iCarly website. iCarly has also made its way into our speech with their zany made up words “skunksack”, “fudgebag”, and “hobknocker”. The line defining TV from our lives is becoming blurred as TV is being infused with society.

It is becoming obvious that we are moving away from print and entering the age of digital media. Books have become educational. Children have fewer options for learning that is also fun. Educational fun has become watching television. Team Umizoomi, a show on Nickelodeon that has decided to focus on incorporating math into their program, now competes with Sesame Street. Children’s shows are also trying to teach social skills as well as letter and numbers. Nickelodeon’s programming has become “increasingly more educational as time has passed,” Ms. Zarghami, Nickelodeon President said. “Blue’s Clues” promotes interactivity, with its pauses for children to find the clues, and “Dora The Explorer” teaches short Spanish phrases while the character is on her adventures. With “Team Umizoomi,” she said, there is “no disguising that it’s math.” Not only is the television influencing a big part of the younger age bracket of society, but the Internet is also. Schools are teaching students how to navigate the web in preparation for the future. Technology has become the new playground. It is transforming everything, especially how we learn and has evolved to be used to manipulate its audience. Kids now use leapsters and other interactive learning devices. It is clear that we have strayed from the use of “old” media such as books.

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Characters on T.V are being created as model citizens. And nearly every show now has some sort of moral. SpongeBob practices good hygiene and loves to keep everything clean and orderly. As he says “Cleanliness Is next to Managerliness.” Other characters such as Dora the Explorer and Diego help friends in need. There is even a shift to make the T.V show characters more diverse to appeal to everyone. “There really was a need for a character of color in children’s programming,” Ted Lempert, president of Children Now said. Dora is the first Latina character to have the leading role on a children’s series. Dora is not identified as being from a specific country, but a character who could be from anywhere. Networks are making characters more relatable and appealing to viewers, specifically children, but also to parents who are targeted because they ultimately approve the shows their kids watch.

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New media is also hard to supervise. Parents are able to review books to determine which material is appropriate for their kids. However, T.V. shows are harder to monitor because there are so many and children can just as easily change the channel. Parents can prevent their children from viewing certain channels through blocking programs, but there are some many alternative ways children can access them; such as, online or at a friend house. There are also multitudes of episodes that vary in content. It is very impractical for a parent to watch every single episode and then decide whether the content is suitable for their child to watch.

The New York Times article, “Dora’ Special Explores Influence on Children” indicates that “Dora is one of the most popular consumer brands in the world, along with SpongeBob…Nickelodeon can market Dora dolls, games, bed linens and children’s clothing to a wide range of consumers. Sales of Dora merchandise have totaled $11 billion since being introduced in 2002” The article “A Fun-Loving Sponge Who Keeps Things Clean” features the popularity of SpongeBob SquarePants relays that his impact is still growing evident by the “global sales of SpongeBob T-shirts, video games and bed sheets that rival the earnings of Bart Simpson and even Mickey Mouse…SpongeBob merchandizing has become something of an industry joke, but there really is a Kraft macaroni & cheese named after SpongeBob, as well as a digital camera and even an amusement park roller coaster.” The popular TV shows are even physically encroaching upon us.

This shift in use of media is not only due to uprising popularity of television and computers but also the pressure of parents on children to rise above and beyond. The New York Times also displayed the article “Picture Books No Longer a Staple for Children” that focuses on the reasons why this new media push is occurring. “Parents are saying, ‘My kid doesn’t need books with pictures anymore,’ said Justin Chanda, the publisher of Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.” There has been a push by parents and educators for kids to start reading earlier and at a harder level; ”We’ve accelerated the graduation rate out of picture books…Many parents overlook the fact that chapter books, even though they have more text, full paragraphs and fewer pictures, are not necessarily more complex.” Picture books have significance to the development of children and should not be skipped. Pushing chapter books has no known effect to enhance the intelligence of the child.

Both parents’ efforts to get their child to read chapter books and the movement toward new technology are causing the continual extinction of the picture book. New media is replacing the old values such as picture books. Technology is growing and transforming into the child’s playground. The Internet has become more user friendly for kids and even targets them as young consumers. The increasing growth technology is infinitely changing the world around us, the media, like ourselves is trying to keep up with times. Here lies print, may it rest in peace…

Wordle: Untitled

Death of the Picture Book Draft

In the article “Leaving The Pictures Behind” the author reveals that publishers reported last week that sales are suffering and they have had to cut down on the number of new titles. Some might blame the recession but the main reason for the decrease in children’s picture books is due to the large push toward reading chapter books. Not only has there been more pressure on higher reading but also print media has become the less popular choice when it comes to influencing today’s youth. It effects everything, morals, values, education, what we are eating, what we are wearing it even infects our speech.  Is multimodal media becoming the new “picture book” for children?

The Walt Disney Company is doing studies on the type of media ads use to get consumers to buy their product. Their media of focus lies in ads televised and on the internet. The article “Lab Watches Web Surfers to See Which Ads Work” affirms “There is also a focus on new forms of advertising in programming shown on actual televisions.” Tracey Scheppach, video innovations director for Starcom MediaVest Group, reveals, “Everybody is trying to figure out the ad models of the future…” Her comment even shows that companies are recognizing the change in interest towards digital media.

The popular show iCarly is a great example of how the media has transitioned into the use of television.  The show features Spencer, Carly’s wacky artist brother, making his famous spaghetti tacos for dinner. After seeing it on iCarly kids are asking for spaghetti tacos for dinner too. The creator of the show, Dan Schneider admits in The New York Times article “It was just a little joke I came up with for one episode, then it turned into a running joke. And now it’s this thing people actually do.” This just shows how influential television shows can be. Even the show demonstrates the evident shift in media. iCarly has her own web show that she makes with her two best friends. Her wed show has inspired toys and other merchandise as well as a real live iCarly website. iCarly has also made its way into our speech with their zany made up words “skunksack”, “fudgebag”, and “Hobknocker”.  The effect that television is having on young adults is evident.

It’s becoming obvious that we are moving away from print and entering the age of digital media. Books have become educational. Children have fewer options for learning that’s also fun. Educational fun has become watching television. Team Umizoomi, a show on Nickelodeon that has decided to focus on incorporating math into their program, competes with Sesame Street. They also try to teach social skills as well as letter and numbers. Nickelodeon’s programming has become “increasingly more educational as time has passed,” Ms. Zarghami, Nickelodeon President said. “Blue’s Clues” promotes interactivity, with its pauses for children to find the clues, and “Dora The Explorer” teaches short Spanish phrases while the character is on her adventures. With “Team Umizoomi,” she said, there is “no disguising that it’s math.” Not only is the television influencing a big part of the younger age bracket of society but also the internet. Schools are teaching students how to navigate the web in preparation for the future. Technology has become the new playground.  It is transforming everything, especially how we learn and are manipulated. Kids now use leapsters and other interactive learning devices. It is clear that we have strayed from the use of “old” media such as books.

Characters on T.V are being created as model citizens. And nearly every show now has some sort of moral or lesson. SpongeBob practices good hygiene and loves to keep everything clean and orderly. As he says “Cleanliness Is next to Managerliness.” Other characters such as Dora the Explorer and Diego help friends in need. There is even a shift to make the T.V show characters more diverse to appeal to everyone. “There really was a need for a character of color in children’s programming,” Ted Lempert, president of Children Now said. Dora is the first Latina character to have the leading role on a children’s series. Dora is not identified as being from a specific country, but a character who could be from anywhere. Networks are making characters more relatable and appealing to viewers, specifically children, but also to parents who are targeted because they ultimately approve the shows their kids watch.

New media is also hard to supervise. Parents are able to review books as to which are appropriate material for their kids. T.V. shows are harder to monitor because there are so many and children can just as easily change the channel. They have blocking programs where parents can prevent their children from viewing certain channels but there are some many alternative ways children can access then; For example, online or at a friend house. There are also multitudes of episodes that vary in content. It is very impractical for a parent to watch every single episode and then decide whether the content is suitable for their child to watch.

The New York Times article, “Dora’ Special Explores Influence on Children” indicates that “Dora is one of the most popular consumer brands in the world, along with SpongeBob…Nickelodeon can market Dora dolls, games, bed linens and children’s clothing to a wide range of consumers. Sales of Dora merchandise have totaled $11 billion since being introduced in 2002” The article “A Fun-Loving Sponge Who Keeps Things Clean” features the popularity of SpongeBob SquarePants relays that his impact his still growing evident by the “global sales of SpongeBob T-shirts, video games and bed sheets that rival the earnings of Bart Simpson and even Mickey Mouse…SpongeBob merchandizing has become something of an industry joke, but there really is a Kraft macaroni & cheese named after SpongeBob, as well as a digital camera and even an amusement park roller coaster.”

This shift in use of media is not only due to uprising popularity of television and computers but also the pressure of parents on children to rise above and beyond. The New York Times also displayed the article “Picture Books No Longer a Staple for Children” that focuses on the reasons why this new media push is occurring. “Parents are saying, ‘My kid doesn’t need books with pictures anymore,’ said Justin Chanda, the publisher of Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.” There has been a push by parents and educators for kids to start reading earlier and at a harder level ”We’ve accelerated the graduation rate out of picture books…Many parents overlook the fact that chapter books, even though they have more text, full paragraphs and fewer pictures, are not necessarily more complex.” This is a common misunderstanding made by parents about the difficulty of chapter books. Pictures books have significance to the development of children and should not be skipped. Pushing chapter books has no known effect to the intelligence of the child.

Both parents and the movement toward new technology are causing the continual extinction of the picture book. New media is replacing the old values such as picture books. Technology has become the child’s playground. The internet has become more user friendly for kids and even targets tem as young consumers.

Wordle: Untitled

Argument and Advocacy Proposal

In my research project I plan to reflect on the life of Rutgers’s student, Tyler Clementi. I will examine the coverage of his life by comparing the articles of The New York Times for seven consecutive days and how The New York Times portrays the situation. I will also explore the harmful effects of bullying is magnified by today’s technology compared to the past by using The New York Times archives to access articles about past suicides. I will study the conviction of his roommate and Tyler’s right to privacy.  Tyler’s roommate’s webcam was used to record Tyler getting intimate with another male and broadcasted on the Internet. The roommate had also posted comments regarding Tyler on Twitter. Rutgers has planned a two-year program to raise awareness about the abuse of new technology. Based on a U.S survey in 2001 conducted by suicide.org: Suicide is the third leading cause of death for young people aged 15-24 year olds and suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students. By exploring the life of Tyler Clementi, I will discuss how the escalading effects of bullying ended it so quickly enhanced by abuse of technology.

 

Textual Analysis Final Draft: Ditch Your Laptop, Dump Your Boyfriend

The article, Ditch Your Laptop, Dump Your Boyfriend, is co-written by six students either holding a Ph.D or M.F.A. They lend their advice and knowledge about college to the reader.

This first insight is shared by Tim Novikoff, a student at Cornell. Novikoff advocates that one must take advantage of the opportunities provided by the freedom of college. He writes that we must explore, try new things, learn, experience, and make new relationships. Do it all. He tries to persuade the reader that all of these new experiences and knowledge shape a person for the future. Novikoff does this by applying these concepts to himself. He demonstrates how he took advantage of opportunities and how they influenced his future by using examples from his own personal life. Novikoff also makes the reader evaluate their own life and judge if risks were taken. “If you were raised in a protected cocoon, this is the time to experience the world beyond.” The reader is left feeling like they did not seize the day. He persuades the reader that they must also experience college in the fullest in a condescending way. He boasts about his exposure. “By dabbling in leadership — I ran the math club and directed a musical — I learned how to formulate a vision and persuade people to join me in bringing it to life.” He preaches that we must try all these things, when in reality he never gives any evidence that he took his own advice. “…save up and go backpacking in Europe or Asia.” Some of his advice seems extreme. Although all of it would be nice, sometimes it is not possible. But do we really need to go backpacking to enjoy life, succeed in college, create a life and live happily ever after? Of course not but even with that said his message of trying new things is important.

The second portion of advice comes from Willie X. Lin, student in the M.F.A. program in creative writing at Washington University in St. Louis. Lin prompts current college students to take time away from campus. It seems like such an easy task compared to what Tim Novikoff called the reader to do. He also persuades the reader to engage in new activities but not those that are as challenging as Novikoff suggests. “…college should be a part of, but not the entire scope of, your existence for the next few years.” Lin’s language and tone is more appealing. He sounds like he is giving genuine advice and not lecturing on the cliché how to live your life to the fullest. Lin is still in college and talks to the reader on the same level. He is also clever and realizes his audience is educated and shows that he is credible with expendable knowledge. “I mention this not because I think your situation will be so dire if you don’t heed my advice, but mostly because “Mrs. Dalloway” is a great read, and I highly recommend it.” Overall this advice was more effective than that given by Novikoff.

The third mini article is written by Aman Singh Gill, who attends Stony Brook University. His focus of concentration lies in research and other work projects. Although working is part of college, he assumes that students are fixated on taking on more of a workload. He approaches his advice with a more serious manner. “…research experience shows you how knowledge is produced. There are worse ways to prepare for life in an information age.” Despite those “worse ways to prepare”, they are not the only options to consider. For some, working with research is on their to do list but the purpose of college does not solely revolve around working. College students are interested in getting an education but also to have fun, enjoy, and experience the new. Gill misses the boat on advice to the freshmen. His advice is original and goes in a different direction than the previous two articles but is not so relevant to the freshmen college experience.

Christine Smallwood from Columbia delivers her words of wisdom in the fourth passage. Her advice is different from everyone else so far. She encourages that one should separate themselves from technology once in a while. “Devices have become security blankets. Take the time to wean yourself.” She finds that it is distracting and not helpful to the learning and living environment. Her tone is friendly and sounds like a first hand experience. “In a lecture, you’ll only waste your time and your parents’ money, disrespect your professor and annoy whoever is trying to pay attention around you by spending the whole hour on Facebook.” Her advice is relevant to all freshmen that struggle with the addictive disease of Facebook. She also ties the use of technology as a negative effect on our learning and also our social life. “This will also have the benefit of making you harder to reach, and thus more mysterious and fascinating to new friends and acquaintances.” Smallwood hits on the important parts of college, the social life and the learning. That is basically what college breaks down to and she poses great advice to incoming freshmen.

Portland State University contemporary art student, Evan LaLonde, narrates his first day at college, which already appeals to the reader and sets up ethos. It sets his tone as friendly and welcoming. LaLonde shows the honest truth about college through his own eyes. “I felt as if I was the only one in the room who didn’t have a clue.” Evan experiences situations that many freshmen can relate to. “But be comfortable with the fact that you don’t know anything. Nobody does.” LaLonde realizes that all first-year college students are new to the same situation, but that is exactly what they all have in common. He concludes with a simple call to action that not only applies to future college freshman, but also to high school freshman, anyone trying something new, and in life in general. “Relax and enjoy the ride.”

The final piece is written by Rebecca Elliott, a sociology student at University of California, Berkeley. Elliott discusses relationships in college, something we can all relate to. She starts by addressing finding friends. Elliot achieves ethos by using her personal experiences as a college freshmen. “Eventually, mercifully, it all shakes out. Parties, activities, dorms and classes help you find people you actually like to talk to.” Elliott transitions from friendships to romantic relationships, and urges the reader or incoming freshmen to simply break up. Although it may be true, it seems a little harsh. The tone quickly changes from personable advice from one peer to another to blunt patronizing. “You should break up soon because you are likely to break up over Thanksgiving, anyway.” She assumes that everyone in her audience has a significant other. Elliott focuses on such a small portion of college that does not reflect college or life as a whole. Her advice cannot be transitioned into a real life situation, which is the entire purpose of college.

This piece targets a college freshmen audience, but it is impractical because most young adults do not read the New York Times. It is more likely that parents will read it and pass on the knowledge. The audience would clearly be educated because the article is aimed at college students.

In general this collaboration of advice to new college students is successful. Each piece varies in content and appeals about the importance of discovery in college.

Revised Draft

The article, Ditch Your Laptop, Dump Your Boyfriend, is co-written by six students either holding a Ph.D or M.F.A. They lend their advice and knowledge about college to the reader.

This first insight is shared by Tim Novikoff, a student at Cornell. Novikoff advocates that one must take advantage of the opportunities provided by the freedom of college. He writes that one must explore, try new things, learn, experience, and make new relationships. Do it all. He tries to persuade the reader that all of these new experiences and knowledge shape a person for the future. Novikoff does this by applying these concepts to himself. He demonstrates how he took advantage of opportunities and how they influenced his future by using examples from his own personal life. Novikoff also makes the reader evaluate their own life and judge if risks were taken. “If you were raised in a protected cocoon, this is the time to experience the world beyond.” The reader is left feeling like they did not seize the day. He persuades the reader that they must also experience college in the fullest in a condescending way. He boasts about his exposure. “By dabbling in leadership — I ran the math club and directed a musical — I learned how to formulate a vision and persuade people to join me in bringing it to life.” He preaches that one must try all these things, when in reality he never gives any evidence that he took his own advice. “…save up and go backpacking in Europe or Asia.” Some of his advice seems extreme. Although all of it would be nice, sometimes it is not possible. But does one really need to go backpacking to enjoy life, succeed in college, create a life and live happily ever after? Of course not but even with that said his message of trying lots of things is important.

The second portion of advice comes from Willie X. Lin, student in the M.F.A. program in creative writing at Washington University in St. Louis. Lin advises current college students to take time away from campus. It seems like such an easy task compared to what Tim Novikoff called the reader to do. He also persuades the reader to engage in new activities but not those that are as challenging as Novikoff suggests. “…college should be a part of, but not the entire scope of, your existence for the next few years.” Lin’s language and tone is more appealing. He sounds like he is giving genuine advice and not lecturing on the cliché how to live your life to the fullest. Lin is still in college and talks to the reader on the same level. He also is clever and realizes his audience is educated and shows that he is credible with knowledge to share. “I mention this not because I think your situation will be so dire if you don’t heed my advice, but mostly because “Mrs. Dalloway” is a great read, and I highly recommend it.” Overall this advice was more effective than that given by Novikoff.

The third mini article is written by Aman Singh Gill, who attends Stony Brook University. His focus of concentration lies in research and other work projects. Although working is part of college, he assumes that students are fixated on taking on more of a workload. “…research experience shows you how knowledge is produced. There are worse ways to prepare for life in an information age.” Even though there are worse ways to prepare they are not the only options to consider. For some, working with research is on their list to do but the purpose of college does not solely revolve around working. College students are interested in getting an education but also to have fun, enjoy, and experience the new. Gill misses the boat on advice to the freshmen. His advice is original and goes in a different direction than the previous two articles but is not so relevant to the freshmen college experience.

Christine Smallwood from Columbia shares her words of wisdom in the fourth passage. Her advice is different from everyone else so far. She advises that one should separate themselves from technology once in a while. “Devices have become security blankets. Take the time to wean yourself.” She finds that it is distracting and not helpful to the learning and living environment. Her tone is friendly and sounds like a first hand experience. “In a lecture, you’ll only waste your time and your parents’ money, disrespect your professor and annoy whoever is trying to pay attention around you by spending the whole hour on Facebook.” Her advice is relevant to all freshmen that struggle with the addictive disease of Facebook. She also ties the use of technology as a negative effect on one’s learning and also one’s social life. “This will also have the benefit of making you harder to reach, and thus more mysterious and fascinating to new friends and acquaintances.” Smallwood hits on the important parts of college, the social life and the learning. That is basically what college breaks down to and she offers great advice to incoming freshmen.

Portland State University contemporary art student, Evan LaLonde, narrates his first day at college, which already appeals to the reader and sets up ethos. It sets his tone as friendly and welcoming. LaLonde shows the honest truth about college through his own eyes. “I felt as if I was the only one in the room who didn’t have a clue.” Evan experiences situations that many freshmen can relate to. “But be comfortable with the fact that you don’t know anything. Nobody does.” LaLonde realizes that all first-year college students are new to the same situation, but that is exactly what they all have in common. He concludes with a simple call to action that not only applies to future college freshman, but also to high school freshman, anyone trying something new, and in life in general. “Relax and enjoy the ride.”

The final piece is written by Rebecca Elliott, a sociology student at University of California, Berkeley. Elliott discusses relationships in college, something we can all relate to. She starts by addressing finding friends. Elliot achieves ethos by using her personal experiences as a college freshmen. “Eventually, mercifully, it all shakes out. Parties, activities, dorms and classes help you find people you actually like to talk to.” Elliott transitions from friendships to romantic relationships, and urges the reader or incoming freshmen to simply break up. Although it may be true, it seems a little harsh. The tone quickly changes from personable advice from one peer to another to blunt patronizing. “You should break up soon because you are likely to break up over Thanksgiving, anyway.” She assumes that everyone in her audience has a significant other. Elliott focuses on such a small portion of college that does not reflect college or life as a whole. Her advice cannot be brought into a real life situation, which is the entire purpose of college.